Wednesday, January 30, 2008

Rochester, NY's 54th Infantry Regiment

For some time now I have been researching the 19th century New York National Guard units in Rochester, NY. From 1863 until 1870 my great-grandfather, Francis Maloney, was a member of the 54th Infantry Regiment as Commanding Officer of I Company and later as the Regimental Major. The following is an overview of the 54th Regiment up until 1863. Later items will cover periods of the regiment's life until it was disbanded in about 1881.


Rochester's local militia units predate even the city itself, as the Rochester Historical Society's archives contain references in Col. Nathaniel Rochester's "day book" for military items as early as 1797. In 1848, Rochester was the home of five independent military organizations. These were: the Union Grays commanded by Major Lansing B. Swan; the Williams Light Infantry commanded by Major John Williams; the City Cadets under the command of Lieutenant C. W. Warren; the German Grenadiers commanded by Captain Frederick C. Lauer; and the Irish Volunteers commanded by Captain Garret Barry.

The Union Grays were organized on December 11, 1838, replacing two prior companies, the Washington Guards and the Pioneer Rifles, and, in 1839, adopted the name the Rochester Union Grays in honor of the city's founder, Colonel Nathaniel Rochester. Members of the old Pioneer Rifles and the City Cadets founded the Williams Light Infantry, also organized in 1838. It was organized in September 1839 and served for a time as a part of the Williams Light Infantry. The German Grenadiers were organized in 1840. Finally, the Irish Volunteers, the oldest of the five were organized in November 1827.

Immediately after the Mexican War a major New York statewide reorganization was made of all local militia units, creating sixty-four eight-company regiments distributed among eight divisions of four brigades each. Following this reorganization, the Rochester units became units of General William E. Lathrop's Fourteenth Brigade and were parts of the 49th and 50th Infantry Regiments, with the 49th composed of companies west of the Genesee River and the 50th composed of companies east of the river. In 1849, General Lathrop's brigade was re-designated the Twenty-fifth Brigade and the 49th was changed to the 54th, and the 50th was changed to the 53rd. In October of that year, the Rochester Union Grays gave up their identity as an independent organization and became Company A of the 54th. Later the name was used by Batteries A and B of the 1st Independent Battalion.

In 1853 the 54th was under the command of Colonel Harrison Fairchild and consisted of six companies: Company A, the Rochester Union Grays, Captain John G. Gray; Company B, the German Grenadiers, transferred from the 53rd Regiment, Captain Frederick C. Miller; Company C, Rochester Light Guards, Captain Scott W. Updike; Company D, German Union Guards, also transferred from the 53rd, Captain George Siebert; Company E, Citizens' Corps, Captain Gilbert S. Jennings; and Company F, the City Dragoons, Captain James Brackett.

The start of the Civil War in 1861 almost saw the demise of the 54th as patriotic members of that organization transferred to active duty regiments. It lost its colonel, Harrison Fairchild, when he resigned his commissioned in the 54th and accepted a colonelcy in the 89th New York Volunteers. Captain Louis Ernst, the regimental adjutant, left and became a lieutenant-colonel in the 140th New York Volunteers, a local infantry regiment under Colonel Patrick O'Rourke reorganized as an artillery unit and gained fame at Gettysburg. Captain Ernst was replaced by G. W. Stebbins. In addition to losses in the officer ranks, Company A, the Union Grays, sent 192 men to the mobilization camp at Elmira to organize as an artillery unit. The remaining members of the Grays remained in Rochester to build-up a two battery battalion of field artillery to become Batteries A and B of the 1st Independent Battalion Light Infantry, under Major William M. Lewis. When this artillery battalion was formed under Major Lewis there were two batteries, commanded by Captains Michael Heavy and Michael Quinn.

As a result of transfers out of the regiment into active duty units, the 54th found itself at the end of 1861 under the command of its senior captain, Captain Miller, of the German Grenadiers. Company E went out of existence as its members joined other active duty units, and the City Dragoons, then Company L, enrolled almost as a unit as Company G, 13th New York Volunteers.

By 1863, now almost depleted, the 54th began to reform as a home guard unit under Colonel Charles H. Clark. Colonel Clark and his field officers, Lieutenant Colonel Frederick Miller and Major N. Thompson, began the task began of filling up the ranks of the regiment under Captains Lewis Spoor, Lawrence Sellinger, Warner Westcott, Libbeus Brown, Isaac Hobbie and Lieutenant Joseph Eichorn. On October 1 of that year the Union & Advertiser noted the formation of Company I with my great grandfather, Francis Gallery Maloney, as the company commander.


ANOTHER COMPANY FOR THE 54TH -- The last company to complete the 54th Regiment was organized last evening by Col. Clark. It is to be know as Company I, and has elected the following officers: Captain, F. G. Maloney; 1st Lieutenant, K. H. C. Griffin; 2d Lieutenant, C. E. Sabin; 1st Sergeant, W. J. Winfield; 2d Sergeant, M. J. Maloney; 3d Sergeant, R. Lavis; 4th Sergeant, G. M. Carmichael; 5th Sergeant, M. D. Whipple; 1st Corporal, H. Mathis; 2d Corporal, Wm. Forkel; 3d Corporal, P. Griffin; 4th Corporal, F. Maloney.

Monday, January 28, 2008

My First Motor Scooter Fill-Up

The gas gauge on my motor scooter was somewhat low and I didn't know how far down I could go without running out so I filled it up. I looks like I am getting about 73 miles per gallon. Not bad. Here's the receipt.

Hanley Emigration - Part IV

Previously I had descbibed the details of my maternal grandmother and some of her siblings. This forth portion describes the emigration of Timothy Hanley in 1912. On the same ship was and traveling with him was a Mary A. Fitzgerald.

Timothy J. Hanley

Timothy left from Queenstown on the 22nt of September 1912 on the SS Mauretania and arrived in the Port of New York on the 30th. The ship's manifest lists him as a 29 year old, single, male and his occupation was T_____ Conductor. (The first word is difficult to read and it may be 'Train' or 'Trolley.') He was able to both read and write, his nationality was British and his race was Irish. His last permanent address was Ardagh, Ireland, his nearest relative in Ireland was his mother, Catherine Hanly, in Ardagh, and his destination was Rochester, NY. He had a ticket to his final destination which he paid for himself and he had $100 with himself. He had never previously been in the U.S. He was to join his brother, Thos. Hanly at 136 Bartlett St. in Rochester. Timothy answered the regular questions concerning polygamy, anarchy, crippled, etc. in the negative and he said that his health was good. He was 5ft. 9in. tall, was described as dark complected with dark hair, grey eyes and had no identifiable marks. Finally, he noted that he was born in Ardagh, Ireland.

Mary A. Fitzgerald

Mary was described as a 25 year old, single, female and her occupation was as a maid. She was able to both read and write, her nationalality was British and race was Irish. Her permanent address was Rochester, USA and stamped over this was, "NON-IMMIGRANT ALIEN." Her nearest relative was her father, Mr. Fitzgerald of Upper Athea in Co. Limerick. Upper Athea is a townland in the parish of Athea in Co. Limerick and Athea and Ardagh are adjoining parishes. Mary stated that she had been in the US since 1894 and she was also going to 136 Bartlett St. in Rochester. In the same area of the form is written, "Cousin Thos. Ahern, 127 Cum______ St." Mary answered 'No' to the polygamy, anarchy, etc. questions and stated that her health was good. She was 5ft. 6in. tall, had fair complexion, fair hair and her eyes were Brown. Finally she stated that she was born in Athea, Ireland.

I have not been able to find a Thomas Ahern in the Rochester City Directory for this time period. However, in the 1920 Federal Census for Rochester, Michael and Catherine O'Connor were living at the 136 Bartlett St. address (along with their son Richard). Living (renting) at 142 Bartlett St. was 65 year old Mary Fitzgerald (who came from Ireland in 1873). Also living with her was her son, Thomas F. Fitzgerald, and his wife, Mary. This is not the same Mary Fitzgerald that accompanied Tim Hanley ans this Mary was 40 years old in 1920 and was born in New York. However, I believe that this family is somehow related to the Hanleys. At least the Aherns are.

When Thomas Hanly and Catherine O'Connell were married in August 1871, the witnesses for the marriage were Thomas Ahern and Helen Ahern. Aherns were sponsors for a number of Hanley children in Ardagh.
  • Mary in 1872 - Daniel Hanley & Johanna Ahern
  • Bridget in 1874 - Michael Ahern & Helen Ahern
  • Hanora in 1875 - John Sheehy & Mary Ahern
  • Daniel in 1878 - John Ahern & Margaret Hanley
  • Joseph in 1880 - Timothy Connell & Mary Ahern
  • Michael in 1882 - Johanna Ahern (this Michael died young)
  • Michael in 1884 - Timothy Mulcahy & Mary O'Connor
  • Margaret in 1887 - Thomas & Catherine Ahern
  • Thomas in 1889 - Daniel Connell & Margaret Ahern
  • Elizabeth in 1893 - Joseph & Hanora Hanley
A number of Aherns are listed in the 1911 Census of Ireland for Glensharrold. The 'House and Building Return' associated with the 1911 Census lists the occupants and owners of the houses in the area where the Hanleys lived. These are the 10 houses in that area with the Occupant's Name, No. of Rooms, Number of Family Members, and Owner's Name.
  • Thomas Ahern, 3, 4, Thomas Ahern
  • Mrs. Hanora Fitzgerald, 3, 6, Hanora Fitzgerald
  • John Sheehy, 2, 7, John Sheehy
  • Michael Mangan, 3, 4, Michael Mangan
  • Morgan Lane, 3, 4, Morgan Lane
  • Mrs. Catherine Hanly, 4, 4, Catherine Hanly
  • Michael Ahern, 3, 3, William Ahern
  • William Ahern, 4, 5, William Ahern
  • Mrs. Margaret Windke, 3, 6, Margaret Windle
  • Edmond O'Connor, 1, 6, William Ahern

Friday, January 25, 2008

Hanley Emigration - Part III

This part of the emigration of some of the Hanleys from County Limerick, Ireland deals with my grandmother's brother, Thomas, and her sister, Margaret. These two came to this country in 1910.

More after the jump.

Thomas and Margaret left Queenstown on October 23, 1910 aboard the SS Caronia and arrived in the Port of New York on October 30. (Just as an aside, my wife and I sailed Cunard's Caronia through the Panama Canal in 2002 or 2003. Of course, it was not the same ship.) The two were listed in order on the ship's manifest as Thomas Hanly and Margaret Hanly.

Thomas Hanley

Thomas was listed as a 20 year old, single, male and his occupation was Bookkeeper. He could both read and write, his nationality was Irish and his race was Irish. His last permanent residence was Ardagh, Ireland and the name and address of his nearest relative in Ireland was his mother, Catherine Hanly, of Ardagh, Co. Limerick. His final destination was Rochester, NY. In answer to the question as to whether he had a ticket to his final destination it was originally 'Yes' and then crossed out and entered 'No.' This is somewhat confusing because in answer to the question as to who paid for the ticket he answered 'Self.' The next item was, did he have $50 and he answered, he did. He stated that he had never been in the U.S. before and he was joining his brother, Michael, at 149 Champlain St. in Rochester, NY. He stated that he had never been in prison and was neither a polygamist nor an anarchist. His health was good and was neither crippled nor deformed. He was 5ft. 11in. tall, was dark complected with dark hair and had brown eyes with no identifiable marks. Finally, he stated that he was born in Ardagh, Ireland.

Margaret Hanley

Margaret was noted as a sister of Thomas and was listed as a 22 year old single, female and her occupation was Maid. The rest of the items were the same as her brother except that she was 5ft. 7in. tall and was born in Glensharrold, Ireland.

Next I will describe Timothy's emigration. This will be interesting as he was apparently traveling with a Mary A. Fitzgerald.

Wednesday, January 23, 2008

Hanley Emigration - Part II

Previously I had described when I thought my maternal grandmother and some of her siblings had come to America. These were those that left Ireland before 1900 when the Ellis Island records were sketchy. Today I will describe the emigration of those Hanley cousins of mine that came after the turn of the century. These are Michael and Catherine.

More after the break.

Michael J. Hanley
Arriving in New York on October 26, 1907 from Queenstown was the SS Campania. The manifest for the Campania lists in order were 24 year old Michael Hanly and 32 year old Catherine Hanly. I believe that Catherine had come to the US earlier and then went back to Ireland. This is reflected in the manifest. Let's first look at Michael's entry

He is listed as a 24 year old, single, male, clerk. He is able to both read and write and his occupation is clerk. His nationality is of Great Britain and race is Irish, and his last permanent address is Glensharrold, Ireland. The name and address of his nearest relative in Ireland is Mr. Thomas Hanly of Glensharrold, Co. Limerick. His final destination is Rochester, NY. He had a ticket to his final destination (ie, Rochester) and he paid for that ticket himself. He was asked whether he was in possession of $50 and, if not, how much. Initially he entered $50 and Catherine entered $10, then both entries were struck out and between the two lines was entered $100. When asked if he had ever been in the United States before he answered 'No.' He then stated that the relative he would join was his sister, Mrs. F. G. Maloney, at 54 Grieg St. in Rochester, NY. Following that were a number of questions as to whether he was a polygamist, anarchist; whether his health was good or whether he was deformed, crippled, etc. He listed his height as 5ft. 9in., complexion and hair were dark and his eyes were brown, had no marks of identification, and was born in Glensharrold, Ireland.

Catherine Hanley

Catherine is listed as a 32 year old, single, female and she could both read and write. Her occupation is listed as H. work and her nationality is of Great Britain and race is Irish. Her last permanent address is listed as Rochester, NY and over that is stamped is "NON IMMIGRANT ALIEN." For the entries for name and address of relative in Ireland and final destination has check marks. Other entries where the answer was the same as the one above it is shown as "Do," ie., "ditto." However other places a check mark is entered meaning the same as "ditto." She stated that she has a ticket to her final destination (Rochester) and she paid for it herself. As noted above, she initially listed $10 as how much money she had and this was crossed out and listed as $100 between her and her brother. When asked if she had ever been in the United States, she answered 'Yes' and that she had been in the U.S. for 16 years and had come before in 1907. The writing is difficult to read and it may not be 16 years. In addition, even though the question was to be when the individuals had originally come to the U.S., all of the other 'non immigrant aliens' shown on the same page have 1907 as the entry. Obviously, it does not mean as I had thought. Catherine says that she is going to join the same relative as her brother (ie., her sister, Bridget, in Rochester) and answered the same as to polygamy, anarchy, etc., and her health. She gave her height as 5ft. 3in., both complexion and hair as dark, and eyes are brown. Finally, she was also born in Glensharrold, Ireland.

The next part of the Hanley Emigration saga will cover Thomas and Margaret, who both arrived in New York in October, 1910.

Tuesday, January 22, 2008

This Year's Travel Plans

The weekend before last my wife and I attended a fund raising luncheon in Miami. It was held aboard one of the cruise ships and in addition to the luncheon, fashion show and the like there was a silent auction. We bid on a few items for one of our daughters who is expecting twins this summer. We also bid on a few 'mini-vacation' items and, as luck would have it, we won some. Later I was thinking that we have quite a full calendar with travel.

We have three days at a golf resort in Georgia. This is great! I absolutely do not play golf but we'll take our grandson and a friend. They can play golf. Then we have three days in Orlando at MGM Studios or Universal Studios. I'm really not sure which but I'm sure my wife will let me know.

On the 6th of April we will be taking a Caribbean cruise for a week. This is a cruise that my wife won playing Bingo on our 64 day Asia, Australia and Polynesia cruise last fall. In the spring we have been taking Transatlantic cruises to Europe and spending a week there. This year it looks like it will be the Caribbean.

In July or August we will fly to Eureka, CA to visit our two newest grandchildren. Don't know yet the due date for the twins.

On around the middle of October we will be in Detroit for my father-in-law's birthday. This will be the big one. He will be 100 years old!

The week after the birthday party in Detroit we will fly to Athens, Greece and start a cruise on our favorite ship, Holland America's MS Prinsendam. This 26 day cruise will stop another of ports in the Med in addition to the Azores, Canaries and Madiera and then across the Atlantic to Fort Lauderdale.

Quite a year for travel!

Monday, January 21, 2008

Hanley Emigration

I have attempted to determine when my grandmother, Bridget Hanley, and her siblings came to this country. Ellis Island records are available online but details are sketchy for ships before about 1900. As a result, I have 'guesses' in the case of my grandmother and her sisters, Mary and Catherine because of the lack of detail information. In the case of Michael, Margaret, Thomas and Timothy their is sufficient information in the records to pin-point the correct persons.

I believe that the first of the Hanley siblings to leave Ireland and come to Rochester, NY may be Mary Frances who probably sailed from Queenstown (now Cobh), the port city for Cork, to New York in 1890. In the 1910 census for Rochester, Mary is listed as living on Grieg Street with his sister, Bridget, and her family and the year of emigration is listed as 1890. Because Ellis Island was not opened until January 1892 no record there would be found.

My grandmother, Bridget, was probably the second to emigrate. In the 1900 census for Rochester she was a servant in the home of Isaac Gibbard on West Avenue and lists her emigration year as 1892. The same is true in the 1910 census when her family was living on Grieg Street as the emigration year is 1892. I believe that she is the 19 year old Bgt. Hanley that sailed from Queenstown on the SS City of Berlin that arrived in New York on July 2, 1892. Although the manifest that she was going to New Jersey that is probably an error.

Catherine Hanley was probably the next Hanley sibling to come to Rochester. In the 1920 census, living on Bartlett Street with her husband and son, the year of emigration is listed as 1893. I have not been able to find a record at Ellis Island using multiple spellings for a Catherine Hanley in 1893. We do know that Catherine (Kate) returned to Ireland and then came back to Rochester in 1907 when her brother, Michael, came here.

This will be continued with the details of the emigration of Michael, Margaret, Thomas and Timothy.

Padraic's New Wheels

Last Fall I got rid of my 12 year old Nissan. There was something wrong with the air condition, brakes and the headliner was hanging down. Nancy and I did not really need two cars. Also I was putting more miles on my bicycle than on my car so I decided to get rid of it. Last Saturday I got my new 'wheels' (actually only two) and here it is!


Not bad, huh?

Friday, January 18, 2008

My Great-grandparents: When Did They Come Here?

Of my eight great-grandparents, seven of them were Irish. Of those that came to this country, when did they come to this country? As it turns out, I don't know. I do, however, have a idea of the approximate time.

Patrick Eagan and Mary Tierney

This set of paternal great-grandparents where in Medina, Orleans Co., NY in January 1853. This I know from the baptismal record at St. Mary's Catholic Church in Medina of their oldest child, Catherine Jane. My great-grandfather, Patrick, is not listed in the federal census for New York for 1850 but he is listed for 1860 living in Rochester, NY. The first census where persons when they came to this country was 1900 but for that year Patrick and Mary were listed on lines 99 and 100, the bottom of the page and the bottom of the page is smudged and most of the entries are unreadable. Fortunately, I do have a copy of the index card entry for them but emigration if not one of the items are not included on the card. My great-grandfather died in 1903 but by great-grandmother lived until 1917 and she is listed in the census of 1910. There the entry notes that she emigrated in 1847. If she came through New York, it would have been through Castle Garden and records from there are not as easily available as those through Ellis Island which did not open until 1892.

William Clarke and Anna Donnelly

I know even less about my other set of paternal great-grandparents. My great-grandfather is listed in the 1860 federal census for Ohio living in Cincinnati with his Mother, Elizabeth, and his twin sister, Mary. The entry notes that Elizabeth and two children were born in Ireland and, of course, no emigration questions were asked in 1860. 1860 is also the first year that any in the family were listed in the Cincinnati City Directory. Both William and his mother were apparently dead by the time of the 1900 census. Anna is listed as the head-of -family in 1900 but she was born in Ohio and I don't know who here parents were.

Francis Maloney and Sarah Weed

My great-grandmother Sarah Weed is my only non-Irish great-grandparent. Her father's ancestors where among Puritans coming to the Massachusetts Bay Colony in the 17th century. Jonas Weed, my 8th great-grandfather, came in 1630 with Governor Winthrop's fleet. Sarah's mother's ancestors were among the Palatines that came to New York's Mohawk River valley in the early 1710's.

Francis' family came from Corofin, Co. Clare, Ireland and were in Rochester, NY by at least 1854 as there is a baptismal record for Margaret Maloney, Francis' sister, for St. Patrick's Church in Rochester. She was born on 26 September in 1854 and Baptized on 1 October. In the Rochester City Directory of 1855 Anthony Maloney was listed as a grocer on State Street. Anthony's wife, Ellen, is listed as a widow in the 1870 City Directory. Francis died in 1872 in Leoni Township, MI so he is listed in no census where emigration is asked. However, two of his brother's were but unfortunately they are not much help. His brother, Michael, is listed in the 1910 federal census for New York in Rochester and there his listing notes that he emigrated in 1870 or possibly 1840. Although it may be 1840 it looks more like 1870 which is not likely. Michael died in 1914 in Greece, NY.

Francis' brother Thomas is listed in both the 1910 and 1920 census records. In 1910 it notes that he emigrated in 1865 and in 1920 it notes that he emigrated in 18_2. There is a smudge in the year! Unless not all of the children came with Anthony and Ellen Maloney came to Rochester when they were there in 1855, the 1865 date is incorrect. Keep in mind, the information in census records does not always come directly from the person listed. It may come from a neighbor or some family member.

Thomas Hanley and Catherine O'Connell

For these maternal great-grandparents the answer to the question as to when they came to this country is easy. They never did! Although seven of their children, including my grandmother Bridget Hanley, did come to this country Thomas and Catherine and four of their children never left Ireland.

I do have emigration for some of the Hanleys in Rochester and that will wait for another day.

Tuesday, January 15, 2008

Eagans in the Rochester, NY City Directory

The Rochester, NY City Directory lists the Eagan family from
1863 until at least 1929. (This is as far as the on-line versions
of the directories at the Monroe County Public Library web site go.)

1863 Eagan, Patrick, moulder, h. Prospect cor. Atkinson
1864-1865 Eagan, Patrick, grocer, Prospect cor. Atkinson, h. do
1866 Eagan, Patrick, grocer, 55 Prospect, h. do
1867 Eagan, Patrick, grocer, 55 Prospect, h. do
1868 Eagan, Patrick, grocer, 55 Prospect, h. do
1869 Eagan, Patrick, grocer, 55 Prospect, h. do
1870 Eagan, Patrick, grocer, 55 Prospect, h. do
1871 Eagan, Patrick, grocer, 55 Prospect, h. do
1872 Eagan, Patrick, grocer, 55 Prospect, h. do
Eagan, James, clerk 14 Front, boards 55 Prospect
1873 Eagan, Patrick, grocer, 55 Prospect, h. do
Eagan, James, clerk 14 Front, b. 55 Prospect
1874 Eagan, Patrick, grocer, 55 Prospect, h. do
Eagan, James, clerk 14 Front, b. 131 Atkinson
1875 Eagan, Patrick, grocer, 55 Prospect, h. do
Eagan, Stephen, salesman, 53 E. Main, b. 55 Prospect
1876 Eagan, Patrick, grocer, 55 Prospect, h. do
Eagan, Stephen, salesman, 53 E. Main, bds. 55 Prospect
1877 Eagan, Patrick, grocer, 55 Prospect, h. do
Eagan, Stephen, blacksmith, 3 Canal, bds. 55 Prospect
(3 Canal St. is the Cunningham Carriage Factory.)
1878 Eagan, Patrick, grocer, 55 Prospect, h. do
Eagan, Stephen, blacksmith, 3 Canal, bds. 55 Prospect
1879 Eagan, Patrick, grocer, 55 Prospect, h. do
Eagan, Stephen, blacksmith, 3 Canal, bds. 55 Prospect
1880 Eagan, Patrick, grocer, 55 Prospect, h. do
Eagan, Stephen, removed to New Haven, Conn.
1881 Eagan, Patrick, grocer, 55 Prospect, h. do
Eagan, Stephen, blacksmith, bds. 24 Jones
1882 Eagan, Patrick, grocer, 55 Prospect, h. do
Eagan, Stephen, removed to Medina
1883 Eagan, Patrick M. (Eagan & Lamont), h. 64 Atkinson
Eagan & Lamont (P. M. Eagan & C. A. Lamont), grocers, 55 Prospect
1884 Eagan, Patrick M., grocer, 82 Prospect, house 110 Atkinson, 64
(House numbers changed this year.)
1885 Eagan, Patrick M., house 110 Atkinson
[Lamont, Charles died Sep. 2, 1884, age 24]
1886 Eagan, Patrick M., house 110 Atkinson
1887 Eagan, Patrick M., house 110 Atkinson
1888 Eagan, Patrick M., house 110 Atkinson
1889 Eagan, Patrick M., house 110 Atkinson
1890 Eagan, Patrick M., house 111 Atkinson
1891 Eagan, Patrick M., house 108 Atkinson
1892 Eagan, Patrick M., house 108 Atkinson
1893 Eagan, Patrick M., house 108 Atkinson
1894 Eagan, Patrick M., house 108 Atkinson
1895 Eagan, Patrick M., house 108 Atkinson
1896 Eagan, Patrick M., house 108 Atkinson
1897 Eagan, Patrick M., house 108 Atkinson
1898 Eagan, Patrick M., house 108 Atkinson
1899 Eagan, Patrick M., house 108 Atkinson
1900 Eagan, Patrick M., house 108 Atkinson
1901 Eagan, Patrick M., house 108 Atkinson
1902 Eagan, Patrick M., house 108 Atkinson
1903 Eagan, Mary, widow Patrick, h. 108 Atkinson
Eagan, Patrick M. died June 1, 1903, age 74
1904 Eagan, Mary, widow Patrick, h. 108 Atkinson
1905 Eagan, Mary, widow Patrick, h. 108 Atkinson
Eagan, Sarah L., bds 108 Atkinson
1906 Eagan, Mary, widow Patrick, h. 108 Atkinson
Eagan, Sarah L., bds 108 Atkinson
Eagan, Stephen, camera maker, h. 85 Prospect
1907 Eagan, Mary, widow Patrick, h. 108 Atkinson
Eagan, Sarah L., bds 108 Atkinson
Eagan, Stephen, camera maker, 333 State, h. 85 Prospect
(333 State Street is Kodak – Camera Works)
1908 Eagan, James W., blacksmith, bds 85 Prospect
Eagan, Mary, widow Patrick, h. 108 Atkinson
Eagan, Sarah L., bds 108 Atkinson
Eagan, Stephen, camera maker, h. 85 Prospect
1909 Eagan, James W., remd to Cincinnati, O
Eagan, Mary, widow Patrick, h. 108 Atkinson
Eagan, Sarah L., bds 108 Atkinson
Eagan, Stephen, blacksmith, h. 85 Prospect
1910 Eagan, Mary, widow Patrick, h. 108 Atkinson
Eagan, Sarah L., bds 108 Atkinson
Eagan, Stephen, blacksmith, h. 85 Prospect
1911 Eagan, James W., auto repairer 13 Canal, bds 85 Prospect
Eagan, Mary, widow Patrick, h. 108 Atkinson
Eagan, Sarah L., bds 108 Atkinson
Eagan, Stephen, blacksmith 13 Canal, h. 85 Prospect
1912 Eagan, James W., pressman 333 State, bds 234 Adams
Eagan, Mary, widow Patrick, h. 108 Atkinson
Eagan, Sarah L., bds 108 Atkinson
Eagan, Stephen, blacksmith 13 Canal, h. 85 Prospect
1913 Eagan, Mary, widow Patrick, h. 108 Atkinson
Eagan, May C., operator, bds 85 Prospect
Eagan, Sarah L., bds 108 Atkinson
Eagan, Stephen, metal worker, 84 Anderson, h. 85 Prospect
1914 Eagan, Mary, widow Patrick, h. 108 Atkinson
Eagan, Sarah L., bds 108 Atkinson
1915 Eagan, Mary, widow Patrick, h. 108 Atkinson
Eagan, Sarah L., bds 108 Atkinson
Eagan, Stephen, blacksmith, h. 85 Prospect
1916 Eagan, Mary, widow Patrick, h. 108 Atkinson
Eagan, Sarah L., bds 108 Atkinson
Eagan, Stephen, blacksmith, h. 85 Prospect
1917 Eagan, Elizabeth, wid Stephen h 85 Prospect
Eagan, Mary, widow Patrick, h. 108 Atkinson
Eagan, Sarah L., bds 108 Atkinson
Eagan, Stephen died Apr 9, 1917
1918 Eagan, Elizabeth, wid Stephen h 85 Prospect
Eagan, Mary, widow Patrick, August 24, 1917
Eagan, Sarah L., h. 153 Plymouth ave
1919 Eagan, Elizabeth, wid Stephen h 85 Prospect
Eagan, James W. (Mae), U S A, h 85 Prospect
Eagan, Mae L., Mrs., tailoress 415 Main E, h 85 Prospect
Eagan, Sarah L., h. 153 Plymouth ave
1920 Eagan, Elizabeth, wid Stephen h 85 Prospect
Eagan, James W. (Mae), helper, h 85 Prospect
Eagan, Sarah L., clerk 409 Municipal bldg, h. 153 Plymouth av
1921 Eagan, James W. (Mae), helper, h 209 Pansy
Eagan, Sarah L., clerk 409 Municipal bldg, h. 153 Plymouth av
1922 Eagan, Austin E., clerk, res 211 Pansy
Eagan, Elizabeth, Mrs., res 211 Pansy
(211 Pansy – O'Brien, Edward J., Jr.)
Eagan, James W. (Mae), helper, h 209 Pansy
Eagan, Sarah L., clerk 409 Municipal bldg, h. 153 Plymouth av
1923 Eagan, Austin E., clerk, res 211 Pansy
Eagan, Elizabeth, Mrs., res 211 Pansy
Eagan, James W. (Mae), helper, h 209 Pansy
Eagan, Sarah L., clerk 409 Municipal bldg, h. 153 Plymouth av
1924 Eagan, Austin, meat cutter, res 191 Raeburn ave
(191 Raeburn ave – O'Brien, Edward J., Jr.)
Eagan, James W. (Mae), h 81 Reynolds
Eagan, Sarah L., clerk 409 Municipal bldg, h. 153 Plymouth av
1925 Eagan, Austin, meat cutter, res 191 Raeburn ave
Eagan, Elizabeth, h 81 Reynolds
Eagan, James W. (Mary), died Mar 6, 1925
Eagan, Sarah L., clerk 20 City Hall, h. 153 Plymouth av
1926 Eagan, Austin, meat cutter, res 191 Raeburn ave
Eagan, Elizabeth, h 81 Reynolds
Eagan, Sara L., clerk 20 City Hall, h. 153 Plymouth av
1927 Eagan, Austin E., clerk 37 Franklin, res 54 Ormond
(37 Franklin – Fahy Market)
Eagan, Sara L., clerk 24 City Hall, h. 153 Plymouth av
1928 Eagan, Austin E., clerk 68 Atlantic av, res 191 Raeburn av
Eagan, Elizabeth, res 191 Raeburn av
Eagan, Sarah L., h 49 Troup
1929 Eagan, Austin E., meat cutter, res 191 Raeburn av
Eagan, Sarah L., h 49 Troup

Monday, January 14, 2008

Presidential Debates in Boca Raton

Later this month, Florida Atlantic University will host Presidential Debates for both the Republican and Democratic candidates. The debate for the Republicans will be held on the 24th and for the Democrats on the 27th. The debates will be aired by MSNBC so I certainly would like to see a Presidential Debate in person. I'm a Democrat so I'm not really interested in the Republican debate but I would like to attend a Democratic debate. However, it appears that the Democratic debate will probably not even occur. Because the Florida Legislature moved the primary up to January, the Democratic National Committee has protested the legislature's move and as a result most Democrat candidates have not campaigned in the state and will probably boycott the debate. So much for attending a Presidential Debate in Boca Raton!